Write what you love.

I love stalking folk singers, watching television, languishing in Virginia Woolf, dramatic readings of Sweet Valley High, awkward moments, and liminal spaces.

I’m the type of person who alphabetizes her books and DVDs (and has midnight fantasies about organizing the books by Library of Congress call number). If you need to know the lyrics to a 1970s sitcom theme song, I’m your girl. Ditto if you need dialogue from Saved by the Bell, the opening description of the Wakefield twins in any Sweet Valley High book, or trivia about Woolf’s writing habits.

These days, I’m writing my way across Pittsburgh, including for fine publications such as Pittsburgh Magazine, Storyburgh, and Pitt Mag among others. Pittsburgh is a super cool city filled with really amazing people doing really weird stuff; also, really weird people doing really amazing stuff. I rather love them all.

Most days, I hang out in the office at Sixth Presbyterian Church, where I maintain a general level of chaos and force my podcast choices upon wayward staff members and congregants who decide to keep me company. On Sundays, I’m known to go to the same church, where I collect church ladies. I don’t know what I’ll do with them once I get the whole set. Every now and again, I teach a class or two, here or there, but mostly I maintain the groove on my newly upgraded couch and think great thoughts about television.

A year ago, I became a foster mom and the journey thus far with Wee Dude is pretty much the best thing that’s ever happened.

For three years, the MFA faculty at the University of Pittsburgh tolerated my neuroses and taught me wonderful things about writing, specifically writing creative nonfiction. For one strange year, I was co-editor in chief of Hot Metal Bridge. In yet another previous life, I earned a BA and an MA (both in English) from Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. While there, I had the privilege of working for Briery Creek Press where great things come from small places.

As a short person who frequently works with children, I’d also say that great things come from small people, too.

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